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How TikTok has become a powerful vector for climate action

TikTok is often seen as an application used by children to share stupid videos. But the reality is that TikTok is becoming a major platform for people to educate others about protecting the environment.

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Eco-influencers on TikTok

An example of an eco-influencer, Philip Aiken who received more than 1.4 million likes on the application. Yet his videos don’t feature animals or celebrities.

@philthefixer

Repairing soil sequesters carbon, creates biodiversity, cleans and restores water supply, and makes food more nutritious. #soil #climatechange #mashup

♬ Trend Mash Up – philthefixer

In fact, Phil Aiken’s messages are about the revaluation of the earth. This 27-year-old is one of the growing number of TikTok users who discuss the benefits of biodiversity in gardens and green spaces against a backdrop of viral sounds. “I see it as planting seeds, and I hope it will germinate and that this person will want to learn more,” says Phil Aiken, known as Phil the Fixer on TikTok.

Biodiversity is of interest to the Z generation.

The most popular TikToks on biodiversity make fun of perfect lawns, promote the qualities of moss, provide explanations, support indigenous practices and also warn against mass extinction.
The most popular TikToks on biodiversity make fun of perfect lawns, promote the qualities of moss, provide explanations, support indigenous practices and also warn against mass extinction.

TikTok has no less than 800 million active users worldwide and is particularly popular with the Z generation. It is estimated that 60% of users were born in the second half of the 1990s. Images and videos continue to reach new audiences when they are picked up on Twitter and Facebook. A subculture known as “grass TikTok”

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, which has collected almost 380 million views, has also appeared on the application. Its community interacts with content on plant species.

Social media can have a good influence on young people.

The designer Evan Phillips, who has more than half a million fans, evaluates different types of grass and displays photos of his fans’ gardens; he has even released grass-themed products. Casey Shultis, 18, another TikTok content creator, believes that containment has further strengthened engagement.

People are sitting at home and now have time to learn more about biodiversity and the environmental crisis,” he says. “I encourage people to understand the importance of planting native biodiversity while seeing the beauty that comes with it”. This story shows that while we may see the use of social media as a bad thing for the younger generation, the fact is that they can be a powerful platform to influence change.

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